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AIR FORCE/MILITARY HISTORY

C-130 HURCULES

The Lockheed C-130 Hercules is an American four-engine turboprop military transport aircraft designed and built originally by Lockheed. Capable of using unprepared runways for takeoffs and landings, the C-130 was originally designed as a troop, medevac, and cargo transport aircraft

Why the C-130 is such a bad ass airplane vidio:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1AH77FCP7uI

The Lockheed Martin C-130 is the US Air Force’s principal tactical cargo and personnel transport aircraft. The C-130J Hercules is the latest model, featuring a glass cockpit, digital avionics and a new propulsion system with a six-bladed propeller.


The C-130 has been in continuous production since 1954, and Hercules aircraft are operational in over 70 countries. Lockheed Martin delivered the 2,600th C-130 Hercules aircraft to the US Air Force in October 2019.


C-130J transport aircraft upgrade

The improvements built into the C-130J, which entered production in 1997, have enhanced the performance of the aircraft in terms of its range, cruise ceiling time to climb, speed and airfield requirements.


A stretched version, the C-130J-30, has been developed and designated the CC-130J by the USAF. The first C-130J-30 for the UK RAF (the launch customer) was delivered in November 1999.


The C-130J entered active service with the USAF at Little Rock Air Force Base in April 2004 and was first deployed in December 2004.


The first of five C-130J Super Hercules aircraft intended for deployment at Little Rock left Lockheed Martin’s facility, for delivery to the base, in August 2013.


The first combat airdrop for the USAF was in July 2005. The US Air Mobility Command declared initial operating capability for the C-130J in October 2006


The US Air Force awarded a $167m block upgrade contract to Lockheed Martin in December 2011 to overhaul the C-130J Hercules with Block 8.1 configuration.


The Block 8.1 configuration contains software and hardware capability expansion such as modernised identification friend or foe (IFF), automatic dependent surveillance broadcast, communication, navigation and air traffic management datalink.



Cockpit of the C-130J Hercules transport aircraft


C-130J is crewed by two pilots and a loadmaster. The new glass cockpit features four L-3 systems with multifunction liquid crystal displays for flight control and navigation systems.


Each pilot has a Flight Dynamics head-up display (HUD). Supplied by BAE Systems IEWS, the dual mission computers, operate and monitor the aircraft systems, and provide status updates for the crew.


The cockpit is fitted with the Northrop Grumman low-power colour radar display. The map shows digitally stored image data.


The C-130J is equipped with a Honeywell dual-embedded global positioning system/inertial navigation system (GPS/INS), an enhanced traffic alerting and collision avoidance system (E-TCAS), a ground collision avoidance system, SKE2000 station keeping system, and an instrument landing system (ILS).


In July 2008, Lockheed Martin announced the following would be included in the baseline configuration of new C-130Js: Elbit Systems global digital map unit, the TacView portable mission display, and InegrFlight commercial GPS landing system sensor unit, supplied by CMC of Canada.



Cargo systems


The cargo bay of the C-130J has a total usable volume of more than 4,500ft³ and can accommodate loads up to 37,216lb. For example, three armoured personnel carriers, five pallets, 74 litters (stretchers), 92 equipped combat troops or 64 paratroops. The bay is equipped with cargo handling rollers, tie-down rings, stowage containers, and stowage for troop seats.



Countermeasures


The ATK AN/AAR-47 missile warning system uses electro-optic sensors to detect missile exhaust and advanced signal processing algorithms and spectral selection to analyse and prioritise threats. Sensors are mounted near the nose just below the second cockpit window and in the tail cone.


The BAE Systems AN/ALR-56M radar warning receiver is a superheterodyne receiver operating in the 2GHz to 20GHz bands. A low-band antenna and four high-band quadrant antennae are installed near the nose section below the second window of the cockpit and in the tail cone.


The BAE Systems Integrated Defence Solutions (formerly Tracor) AN/ALE-47 countermeasures system is capable of dispensing chaff and infra-red flares in addition to the POET and GEN-X active expendable decoys.


The Lockheed Martin AN/ALQ-157 infra-red countermeasures system generates a varying frequency-agile infrared jamming signal. The infrared transmitter is surface-mounted at the aft end of the main undercarriage bay fairing.


USAF selected the Northrop Grumman Large Aircraft Infra-red Countermeasures (LAIRCM) system, an additional electronic warfare self-protection (EWSP) system, to equip its C-130 aircraft. LAIRCM is based on the AN/AAQ-24(V) NEMESIS.


The system achieved final operational capability (FOC) in December 2019.


A five-year delivery order for the system was placed by USAF in July 2006. Australia requested the sale of LAIRCM to equip its fleet of 12 C-130J in May 2008. The LAIRCM


system was installed in C-130J aircraft by AIR 5416 (Phase 4B2) for the protection of the Australian Defence Force (ADF).